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Cooperatives as tool for economic empowerment

January 13, 2011


January 11, 2011, 10:28pm

MANILA, Philippines – Cooperatives have been organized in the Philippines to have a “strong voice” in economic development.

Farmers and other workers have banded together to achieve lower prices for the goods and services they need. A strong bargaining power is what cooperatives seek for their benefit.

Cooperatives, be they electric, farmer, vendor, market, or fisherman groups, are becoming tools for economic empowerment, especially in the rural areas. They are government partners in the delivery of livelihood and micro-entrepreneurial activities geared to addressing the problem of poverty and, to some extent, resolve insurgency. They help alleviate the living conditions of members through marketing support, credit facilities, introduction of new technology, adult education, livelihood during the lean harvest months, and scholarships for their children.

There are now 384 registered cooperatives in the list of the National Confederation of Cooperatives (NATCCO), a party-list group acting as umbrella organization seeking greater support, both local and foreign, for cooperative enterprises in the country. Congress, in a recent committee hearing, urged the National Economic and Development Authority to tap and engage cooperatives to pursue more people-oriented projects. The formation of more cooperatives is expected to boost the public-private partnership program of the administration, and make for active, vibrant communities in the countryside.

It is not only in the Philippines that cooperatives are making their mark. Cooperatives are being formed in many countries to assist the poor and rural workers. In Japan, Germany, China, and other nations, workers, especially small farmers and fisherfolk, are pooling their resources to have a strong bargaining power and lower the prices of goods and services.

Through cooperatives, the people in many countries are forging an economic empowerment that gives them a more vital role in national development.

MANILA, Philippines – Cooperatives have been organized in the Philippines to have a “strong voice” in economic development.

Farmers and other workers have banded together to achieve lower prices for the goods and services they need. A strong bargaining power is what cooperatives seek for their benefit.

Cooperatives, be they electric, farmer, vendor, market, or fisherman groups, are becoming tools for economic empowerment, especially in the rural areas. They are government partners in the delivery of livelihood and micro-entrepreneurial activities geared to addressing the problem of poverty and, to some extent, resolve insurgency. They help alleviate the living conditions of members through marketing support, credit facilities, introduction of new technology, adult education, livelihood during the lean harvest months, and scholarships for their children.

There are now 384 registered cooperatives in the list of the National Confederation of Cooperatives (NATCCO), a party-list group acting as umbrella organization seeking greater support, both local and foreign, for cooperative enterprises in the country. Congress, in a recent committee hearing, urged the National Economic and Development Authority to tap and engage cooperatives to pursue more people-oriented projects. The formation of more cooperatives is expected to boost the public-private partnership program of the administration, and make for active, vibrant communities in the countryside.

It is not only in the Philippines that cooperatives are making their mark. Cooperatives are being formed in many countries to assist the poor and rural workers. In Japan, Germany, China, and other nations, workers, especially small farmers and fisherfolk, are pooling their resources to have a strong bargaining power and lower the prices of goods and services.

Through cooperatives, the people in many countries are forging an economic empowerment that gives them a more vital role in national development.

Source: Manila Bulletin

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